Considerations and Logistics: Brush Strokes

Posted by on Apr 19, 2011 in Bowls, Brush Strokes, How-to, Mugs, Plates, Red and White, Resist, Spring Snow, Tools | 0 comments

In this series of entries, I am sharing some of the discoveries I am making as I try to add texture and interest to my pots.

Some techniques I have been experimenting with are:

  • Slip trailing
  • Carving
  • Brush strokes
  • Tape and wax resist

Small plate - opaque red and white glaze; black glaze applied on top with thick brush

Technical – Technical logistics include types of glazes and brushes.  Although this has been the easiest of the logistics to resolve, it eluded us for a while.  We kept trying to paint fine lines with thick brushes – that doesn’t work.  Fine lines require very fine brushes.

Small plate - design with slip and underglaze applied with fine brush

Method – The preferred method is to paint underglaze on greenware  because it can be wiped it off if I make a mistake.  After the bisque-fire, it won’t smudge when I dip the pot in another glaze.   I have also used underglaze on top of glaze which is good for lines but not as good for designs.

Glaze response – Understanding the properties each glaze exhibits has been key (this is a prevalent truth).  Translucent and clear glazes allow the underglaze to show.  In order to use opaque glazes, brush strokes need to be applied on top of the opaques.

Design – All that the factors I identified with slip, carving, and resist are true with brush strokes – what patterns, how do the patterns relate to the rest of the pot, how to designate a space on the pot.  However, this application demands a bit more representative drawing skills.

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