Inventory Maintenance

Posted by on Aug 22, 2012 in Craft Show, Maintenance, Philosophy | 0 comments

“I would rather be prolific than perferct.” – Abel James

Since the Bele Chere show, Julie and I have been throwing together when our schedules allign and independently at other times.    This is our show season so we have pots to make.  This is also the time of year we look at our stores and begin rotating pots and increasing inventory in anticipation of the holidays.  (Holidays!?  It is still the sweltery summer – it has taken a few years but we realize that the holidays come so quickly that they might as well be next week).

How does this work?  I look over the sales and evaluate what sold – largest number sold, highest grossing, average price point, etc.  Then we consider the customer comments and our inventory.  As a consummate list maker, I make a list of what we need.  Then we divy up the list.  Although we throw together and independently, we glaze together.  

After a few years of doing shows and knowing what we like to make, we had a good idea of what we needed to work on this past winter.   At this point, in order to get ready for the next show, we make pots to replace the pots we sold at last show.  The fall is a very busy time for both of us (we average a show per month), so it is much easier if we can work this way.

I talk to a lot of developing potters who often say to me that they don’t want sell because they don’t want to have to make particular items.  Actually, I hear this from a lot of hobbiest in various media.  And, I understand it.  If it doesn’t bring you joy, than don’t do it.  But for me, the shows drive me to make pots and the result is I make more pots of better quality.    For some potters, Christmas functions as a driving force for them to get into the studio and work.  I have seen Christmas lists that would overwhelm a crew of elves.  But, the list keeps the potters focused and throwing.  Shows do this for me and they give me the opportunity to make more pots than I could otherwise make.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× five = 25